HN Electronic Engineering Bundle (Pearson)

This bundle of HN Engineering units has been specifically put together for those who are looking to study a few units that will directly benefit them in the electronic engineering industry, giving them the skills and expertise to progress in the industry by taking on more highly-skilled roles.

We can now offer units in bundles of between 1-4 units, instead of solely through a full HN qualification, owing to to Pearson's new HN Flex scheme.

The HN Flex scheme allows you to gain skills in a more efficient and bite-size way , without having to enrol in a full qualification course. It means you can study individual, stackable Higher National (HN) units with the progression opportunity of a full, long-term Higher National qualification in the future.

HN Flex may appeal to you if you are:
• Someone who has previously studied HN units or obtained an HNC or HND, and you would like to top up your knowledge and skills base.
• Have the long-term ambition of obtaining a Higher National qualification, but for the time being would only like to study a few topics/units, which can be banked and then used later on down the line towards your qualification.
• Interested in gaining more niche skills, to upskill or reskill, for Continuing Professional Development (CPD), instead of completing a full qualification.
• Interested in studying a combination of topics/units from both our HN Engineering and HN Business programmes. Someone working in engineering who is required to develop skills in business management would take up this route.

Upon completing an individual HN unit, students receive a Certificate of Unit Credit (CoUC) which will detail the unit(s) studied, Ofqual number and the unit credits. Students can then progress to a full HN via the Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) process.

Benefits For Students:
• Fully accredited by Pearson Edexcel. 15 credits awarded per unit under the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)
• Flexible, unlimited tutor support seven days per week.
• No exams! All assessments are based on assignments that you submit in your own time.
• Fast marking within 48 hours of submission.
• No deadlines and flexible study that you can complete in your own time - you can balance work, life and your studies.
• Credits banked towards internationally recognised courses – BTEC Higher Nationals are delivered by universities, colleges, and distance learning providers in 60 countries around the world.
• Flexible and competitive payment plans.
• 14-day money-back guarantee.
• No attendance required – All learning and assessment resources are hosted online.
• All learning objectives are part of the RQF framework, and all resources are the same as the usual Pearson Edexcel HNC/D resources.

Benefits For Employers:
• Provide CPD via specific occupationally relevant units.
• No need for long commitment to a full qualification.
• Lower investment.
• The ability to target specific knowledge, skills and behaviours and upskill employees rapidly.
• The chance to build relationships with the region’s local college/s.

Module Details - How Will It Work?

The recommended electronics-based units appear on the first tab below, although you can select any combination of units you like (to view all available HN Engineering units please head to the HN Flex main page). Samples of the workbooks are available to view below, along with the official Pearson unit specifications (click on the unit title). Please note that if you don't have a Pearson HNC in Engineering, you may only select level 4 units, as the same entry requirements apply. We strongly recommend including at least one out the following three units (U2 Engineering Maths, U3 Engineering Science, U19 Electrical & Electronic Principes) in your flex bundle, should you wish to, later on, top-up to a full HNC.

U19 Electrical & Electronic Principles

This unit will give a wide overview of the electrical and electronic principles used in engineering.

On successful completion of this unit, students will have a good and wide-ranging grasp of the underlying principles of electrical and electronic circuits and devices and will be able to proceed with confidence to further study.

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

1. Apply an understanding of fundamental electrical quantities to evaluate circuits
with constant voltages and currents.

2. Evaluate circuits with sinusoidal voltages and currents.

3. Describe the basis of semiconductor action and its application to simple
electronic devices.

4. Explain the difference between digital and analogue electronics, describing simple
applications of each.

Please note that we strongly recommend that you study our Bridging Maths course before starting this unit if you haven't studied Maths to at least level 3.

U15 Automation, Robotics and PLCs

The aim of this unit is for students to investigate how Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) and industrial robots can be programmed to successfully implement automated engineering solutions.

On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to program PLCs and robotic manipulators to achieve a set task, describe the types and uses of PLCs and robots available, write simple PLC programs, and program industrial robots with straightforward commands and safety factors.

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

1. Describe the design and operational characteristics of a PLC system.

2. Design a simple PLC program by considering PLC information, programming and
communication techniques.

3. Describe the key elements of industrial robots and be able to program them with
straightforward commands to perform a given task.

4. Investigate the design and safe operation of a robot within an industrial
application.

U16 Instrumentation and Control Systems

This unit introduces students to the important principles, components and practices of instrumentation in the controlling of a process system, together with the terminology, techniques and components that are used in such a system.

On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to explain why the measurement of system parameters is critical to a successful process control performance, describe when and how such measurements are carried out, and develop skills in applying predicted values in order to ensure stability within a control system for a range of input waveforms.

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

1. Identify the instrumentation systems and devices used in process control.

2. Investigate the industrial process control systems.

3. Analyse the control concepts and technologies used within an industrial process.

4. Apply predicted values to ensure stability within a control system.

U20 Digital Principles

The unit introduces the two main branches of digital electronics, combinational and sequential. Thus, the student gains familiarity in the fundamental elements of digital circuits, notably different types of logic gates and bistables. The techniques by which such circuits are analysed, introduced and applied, including Truth Tables, Boolean Algebra, Karnaugh Maps, and Timing Diagrams.

On successful completion of this unit, students will have a good grasp of the principles of digital electronic circuits and will be able to proceed with confidence to further study.

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

1. Explain and analyse simple combinational logic circuits.

2. Explain and analyse simple sequential logic circuits.

3. Describe and evaluate the technologies used to implement digital electronic
circuits.

4. Describe and analyse a range of digital subsystems, hence establishing the
building blocks for larger systems.

U22 Electronic Circuits & Devices

This unit introduces students to the use of electronics manufacturers’ data to analyse the performance of circuits and devices, the operational characteristics of amplifier circuits, the types and effects of feedback on a circuit performance, and the operation and application of oscillators. They will also be introduced to the application of testing procedures to electronic devices and circuits and use the findings of the tests to evaluate their operation.

On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to determine the operational characteristics of amplifier circuits, investigate the types and effects of feedback on an amplifier’s performance, examine the operation and application of oscillators and apply testing procedures to electronic devices and circuits.

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

1. Determine the operational characteristics of amplifier circuits.

2. Investigate the types and effects of feedback on an amplifier’s performance.

3. Examine the operation and application of oscillators.

4. Apply testing procedures to electronic devices and circuits.

U43 Further Electrical Machines and Drives

The aim of this unit is to continue developing the skills in the use and application of electrical machines, particularly direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC) drives. Among the topics included in this unit are; an introduction to electrical machines and drives, and their characteristics, starting and braking, loading conditions, ratings, and their control.

On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to explain the operation of different motors used in industry, describe the different types of industrial drives used in various disciplines, assess the importance of electrical machines and their drives for a given industrial application, analyse their performances and suggest appropriate solutions using a variety of possible methods.

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

1. Explore the principles of operation and the characteristics of electrical machines and their industrial applications.

2. Illustrate the fundamentals of power electronics converters used in power processing units for electric drives.

3. Demonstrate the fundamentals of DC drives and their industrial applications.

4. Demonstrate the fundamentals of AC drives and their industrial applications.

U44 Industrial Power, Electronics and Storage

This unit presents a wide-ranging introduction to the field of existing and renewable energy systems. The unit will also explore the potential impacts of climate change and why more, and different forms of, sustainable energy sources are required together with the need for energy efficiency measures.

By the end of this unit, students will be able to examine the technological concepts behind providing a sustainable electrical energy supply for the future. They will also be able to describe how the fundamental technical and economic processes and drivers at play in the electrical power industry affect the selection and use of energy sources.

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

1. Evaluate energy demand to determine the technology and methods of energy production.

2. Discuss current energy efficiency measures, technologies and policies specific to the building and transportation sectors.

3. Analyse the control techniques of power electronics for renewable energy systems.

4. Investigate the impacts of renewable resources to the grid and the various issues associated with integrating such resources to the grid.

U45 Industrial Systems

This unit presents a structured approach to the development of advanced electronic solutions in a range of industrial situations. Among the topics included in this unit are techniques and applications of electrical and electronic engineering, as they apply to various branches of industry, such as component handling, controlling the speed or torque of a motor or responding to change of circumstances in a process.

On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to describe system elements and consider their overall characteristics. This provides opportunity for analytically assessing the accuracy and repeatability of electronic instruments.

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

1. Evaluate energy demand to determine the technology and methods of energy production.

2. Discuss current energy efficiency measures, technologies and policies specific to the building and transportation sectors.

3. Analyse the control techniques of power electronics for renewable energy systems.

4. Investigate the impacts of renewable resources to the grid and the various issues associated with integrating such resources to the grid.

U46 Embedded Systems

This unit builds on introductory knowledge students have already gained in electronic circuits. It develops their knowledge of computer hardware, focussing on the small, low-cost type of computer (i.e. a microcontroller), usually used in embedded systems. It then develops skill in devising circuits which operate external to the microcontroller and interface with it; generally, these relate to sensors, actuators, human interface or data transfer.

Students will also develop programming skills writing programmes which download straight to the microcontroller and cause it to interact with its external circuit. They will then explore the wider context of embedded systems, learning how they are applied in ‘hi-tech’ applications, in many cases revolutionising our ability to undertake certain activities.

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

1. Explore the principle features of a microcontroller and explain the purpose of its constituent parts.

2. Design and implement simple external circuitry, interfacing with a given microcontroller.

3. Write well-structured code in an appropriate programming language, to simulate, test and debug it.

4. Evaluate the applications of embedded systems in the wider environment, including in networked systems.

U52 Further Electrical, Electronic, and Digital Principles

The emphasis in this unit will be on developing a structured approach to the analysis of AC single-phase and three-phase powered circuitry. This will help students to arrive at the solution in the most efficient way, with the greatest probability of it being correct.

Successful completion of this unit will enable students to cope with increasingly complex problems and prepare them for the challenge of Level 6 academic programmes.

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

1. Use appropriate mathematical techniques to solve a range of electrical and electronic problems.

2. Apply appropriate circuit theorems to solve problems in electrical networks.

3. Use appropriate laboratory and computer simulation techniques to investigate both analogue and digital circuits and interpret the results.

4. Explain the characteristics of non-linear circuits to predict their behaviour under a variety of conditions.

U63 Industrial Services

The student will be introduced to the fundamental principles of electrical power and lighting systems, the rudiments of industrial compressed air systems, the provision of steam for both power generation and process plant, and the applications and precepts of refrigeration plant and heat pumps.

On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to manage and maintain a wide range of commonly encountered industrial systems.

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

1. Apply the operating principles of electrical power and lighting systems.

2. Investigate the applications and efficiency of industrial compressors.

3. Discuss provision of steam services for process and power use.

4. Review industrial refrigeration and heat pump systems.

Entry Requirements - How Do I Apply?

The usual entry requirement is a level 3 qualification in this field. However, mature candidates who do not possess such qualifications but have experience in the engineering field can also be accepted onto the course. Please note that if you don't have a Pearson HNC in Engineering, you may only select level 4 units, as the same entry requirements apply. Please get in touch with our admissions team, who will be able to tell you if you meet the entry requirements and provide advice on what you will need to enrol on this course.

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Progression - What Can I Do After My Course?

What you do after your unit(s) entirely depends on how many you have already banked. You may have chosen to study an initial one unit, meaning you can continue to register for more units individually up to a maximum of four. At any point (after one, two, three, or four units), you may decide to use the credits banked towards a full Pearson HN qualification.

If you have completed four HN units, the next step would be to consider using your credits towards a full Pearson HN qualification, as you cannot study more than four individual units under the HN Flex scheme.

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